Religion topics research paper

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Some 39% of Americans support the increased use of hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” to extract oil and natural gas from underground rock formations, while 51% of the public are opposed. 6 The religiously unaffiliated stand out for their lower levels of support of fracking; 28% of this group favors increased fracking, while 64% are opposed. Lower support for fracking also is seen among Hispanic Catholics (33%) and among Hispanics overall (32%). Protestants are closely divided on this issue, with 46% in favor and 43% opposed to increased fracking.

Religious “nones” are by no means monolithic. They can be broken down into three broad subgroups: self-identified atheists, those who call themselves agnostic and people who describe their religion as “nothing in particular.” Given these different outlooks, it is not surprising that there are major gaps among these three groups when it comes to why they left their childhood religion behind. An overwhelming majority of atheists who were raised in a religion (82%) say they simply do not believe, but this is true of a smaller share of agnostics (63%) and only 37% of those in the “nothing in particular” category.

Religion topics research paper

religion topics research paper

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