Sierra leone research paper

In July 2017, police in Sierra Leone banned group jogging in the street on the grounds that it encourages "disruptive behavior." Group jogging had taken on a political tone in parts of Sierra Leone. For example, presidential candidates organized "fun runs" in Freetown and the northern town of Makeni, with participants wearing T-shirts bearing the name of the political party they support. The police's " Public Notice " about the ban said "individuals desiring to jog for health reasons" were "at liberty to do so, but at recreational facilities or at the beach" and added that "any group of persons now found jogging in the streets without authorization will be dealt with according to law. You have been warned." This seemed to underscore the ban's intent to restrict freedom of assembly of oppositional political parties and activitists.

The Rural and Private Sector Development Project established working relationships with all 13 elected district councils of the country, approved matching grants to 75 Farmer Based Organizations (FBOs) with a total membership of nearly 5,000. These grants have provided storage sheds, drying floors, and processing equipment for the FBOs. The project supported the creation of cocoa cooperatives with a membership of nearly 13,000 people; the rehabilitation, financial, and post-contract management of nearly 530 kilometers of feeder roads, (excluding over 500km rehabilitated under phase 1), providing capacity building in the procurement of contractors for rehabilitation and routine maintenance; the establishment of seed nurseries and distribution of over million cocoa seedlings and other planting materials for rice, cassava, and cocoa to farmers, which is helping improve productivity and rural incomes; and the establishment of a market information system and initiation of studies to support the creation of food safety standards to boost exports. 

The usual dangers found in undeveloped sub-Saharan Africa, though, are present: traffic and disease . Traffic accidents are far less common than they have any right to be, but be aware that the overcrowded, barely hanging together poda-podas are physics-defying death-traps. Similarly, moto-taxis love speed , with total disregard to the lurking dangers of broken roads, gaping potholes, charging trucks lurking in the dust. There have been a small number of very serious crashes involving buses in remote areas. Walking around the cities at night is hazardous not so much for fear of crime, but rather because the lack of lighting can cause a fall, or a driver might not see you in the road. Locals carry cell phones that have flash-lights, if yours does not, always bring a torch.

Despite significant natural wealth, Sierra Leone remains one of the poorest countries in the world: around 80 per cent of its population live in crippling poverty. Semi-arid rural areas tend to be more affected than the urban centres of the country. The average Sierra Leonean can expect to live to 48 years, one of the lowest life expectancy figures in the entire world.

Nearly half the population is severely undernourished as regular access to food and drinking water remains scarce. HIV/AIDS remains a persisting public health issue in Sierra Leone, a country that is home to 49,000 people who suffer from the disease. Although noticeable progress has been made over recent years, HIV continues to be a significant problem in rural areas which are generally more affected than urban centres.

In 2014, the Ebola epidemic disrupted all aspects of life in Sierra Leone. Many families were negatively affected: the price of fuel and most basic food went up and in areas where movement was restricted, adults couldn’t go out to earn a living.
 

Sierra leone research paper

sierra leone research paper

Despite significant natural wealth, Sierra Leone remains one of the poorest countries in the world: around 80 per cent of its population live in crippling poverty. Semi-arid rural areas tend to be more affected than the urban centres of the country. The average Sierra Leonean can expect to live to 48 years, one of the lowest life expectancy figures in the entire world.

Nearly half the population is severely undernourished as regular access to food and drinking water remains scarce. HIV/AIDS remains a persisting public health issue in Sierra Leone, a country that is home to 49,000 people who suffer from the disease. Although noticeable progress has been made over recent years, HIV continues to be a significant problem in rural areas which are generally more affected than urban centres.

In 2014, the Ebola epidemic disrupted all aspects of life in Sierra Leone. Many families were negatively affected: the price of fuel and most basic food went up and in areas where movement was restricted, adults couldn’t go out to earn a living.
 

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