Write a thesis for me

In one project, I worked in an interdisciplinary team on strategic social policy. We each read 200 to 300 bits of data a day  (policy summaries, newspaper articles, and other short reports). We summarised the material as a five minute oral summary or occasionally we provided an one to two page report. My largest report for that team was 15 pages, including photos, tables and references. The project ran for six months, it included a review of over hundred empirical studies and reports as well as analysis of lengthy qualitative interviews that I’d conducted. Whittling the length to 15 pages was one of the toughest things I’ve ever done at a time when I was already used to writing in brief. The length of that report ended up being very controversial since policy makers hate reading anything longer than a two page Executive Summary. The reason why the report was 15 pages and not two pages was because my direct client wanted that extra detail. But I got away with it with other stakeholders because my short Exec Summary was deemed to be very useful. In large part, this was because the Exec Summary included a large table, which actually “hooked in” my broader policy audience.

13. Include a title on your proposal. I'm amazed at how often the title is left for the end of the student's writing and then somehow forgotten when the proposal is prepared for the committee. A good proposal has a good title and it is the first thing to help the reader begin to understand the nature of your work. Use it wisely! Work on your title early in the process and revisit it often. It's easy for a reader to identify those proposals where the title has been focused upon by the student. Preparing a good title means:

    ...having the most important words appear toward the beginning of your title,

    ...limiting the use of ambiguous or confusing words,

    ..breaking your title up into a title and subtitle when you have too many words, and

    ...including key words that will help researchers in the future find your work.
14. It's important that your research proposal be organized around a set of questions that will guide your research. When selecting these guiding questions try to write them so that they frame your research and put it into perspective with other research. These questions must serve to establish the link between your research and other research that has preceded you. Your research questions should clearly show the relationship of your research to your field of study. Don't be carried away at this point and make your questions too narrow. You must start with broad relational questions.

Write a thesis for me

write a thesis for me

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